Projects

Moon Over Us Project is in KidCafe & EIS Academy 2016-2017

posted Sep 12, 2015, 8:32 AM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Oct 26, 2016, 10:57 PM ]

Lunar Eclipse by
Welcome to the iCollaboratory 2016-17 Projects in Kidcafe & EIS Academy

We have an exciting year planned for you!  We hope you are planning to join us. You are invited to create and sponsor your own projects; update or revitalize a project that is already in the iCollaboratory; or work in one of this year’s featured projects.

The iCollaboratory and Kidlink invite all students to participate online at NO cost.

To register for a project send email to icollaboratory@gmail.com with your school name, number of student participants and grade levels. Students will need individual Kidlink accounts.

Please register for each of these projects a few weeks before it is scheduled to begin.

Moon Over Us: Moon Phases -September 17-December 31 in Kidcafe and EIS Academy.   Project Opens September 16, 2016 


In Moon Over Us: Moon Phases, students become cultural astronomers. They take a survey about the moon; draw images or take digital pictures of the moon once a week from September 19 to October 19 to get the full cycle; research and compare each others images of the moon; create webpages that include poetry, history, beliefs,stories, and research. Students use dialogue,comments, and discussion to share their valuable insights. The project ends with a final survey and sharing reflections. Students receive iCollaboratory/Kidlink Web Badges and a certificate for completing the project.

Please join us with your students by sending an email to icollaboratory@gmail.com letting us know how many students you have. Also attach a five column spread sheet with each student listed by  username, password, firstname, lastname, and school name. 


Moon Over Us: Monthly Cycle and Influences on People - January-February  Project closed until January 2017.

It happens at least once every month. Sometimes, rarely, it happens twice a month. Up there in the sky. It's a bird. It's a plane. No, it's a FULL MOON.

Popular legend has it that the full moon brings out the worst in people: more violence, more suicides, more accidents, and more aggression. The influence of the moon and behavior has been called "The Lunar Effect" or "The Transylvania Effect."  The belief that the full moon causes mental disorders and strange behavior was widespread throughout Europe in the middle ages. Even the word "lunacy" meaning "insanity" comes from the Latin word for "moon."

By http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/moon.html

Is there scientific evidence to support these beliefs? Let's look at the data.

In this project, students become scientists.  They take a fact-or-fiction survey; share history and beliefs about the influence of the moon on their lives in spreadsheets and documents; use scientific process to prove facts and fictions about births, deaths and accidents in spreadsheets. After their research is complete, students create webpages to summarize their information and comment on the webpages. For those students who are available, we will Skype chat about their research. To complete the project, students take a final survey and share their reflections about what they have learned. They will receive iCollaboratory Web Badges and certificates for completing the project.

Moon Over Us: Moon Phases - March-April  with conclusions in May Project now closed until March 2017

In the project, student astronomers around the world exchange results and analyze the differences of images of the moon and discuss this information by commenting on each other’s webpages.

In addition, students will research and share stories and legends about the Moon. The result is an intercultural exchange of explanations about the differences and similarities of each country from the sky, the data gathering technology, and cultural traditions.

After completing the project,including a final survey and sharing reflections about their learning, students receive a Web Badge and a certificate.

 

We hope you will join us!

To register for a project send email to icollaboratory@gmail.com with your school name, number of student participants and grade levels.

Please register for each of these projects a few weeks before it is scheduled to begin.

Thank you,

 

Bonnie Thurber

iCollaboratory Director

Kidlink Board of Directors


How Big Is Earth?

posted Sep 12, 2015, 8:25 AM by Bonnie Thurber


Hello Friends and Colleagues - Middle School Teachers World Wide, 

Please register, review and begin the "How Big is Earth" project in the iCollaboratory on or after Sept 1. 

This project is funded by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation.

Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students can measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. This project meets standards for Math, Science, Reading and Geography. Students receive buttons for each activity.

The second project officially begins June 1. If you start early your students will learn lots more. The dates you need to remember are Sept 1, and Sept 19, 20, 21, and 22. All angle measurements are due by Sept. 23. Raw measurements should be taken on Sept. 19, 20, 21 or 22. If those days are cloudy or your students are on vacation, please use Activity 7a or 7b to collect the correct measurements and post them early. 

  1. How Big is Earth is for classroom students ages 10-15 years.
  2. The project-class is held in the iCollaboratory (a Moodle and Google Apps for Education private domain)
  3. In Moodle, the project is found at http://new.icollaboratory.net/course/view.php?id=101
  4. All participants need a username and password to log in.
  5. If you are a teacher and need  an iCollaboratory user name, go to the address above and click create account.
  6. To create accounts for your students please view http://www.icollaboratory.org/create-accounts and send a note to icollaboratory@gmail.com
For more information, please contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Thank you,
Bonnie Thurber and the iCollaboratory Team

How Big is Earth repeats in June!

posted May 26, 2015, 1:07 PM by Bonnie Thurber

Morocco Shadows
Hello Friends and Colleagues, Teachers of students ages 10 -15, 

Please review, register for, and begin the "How Big is Earth" project in the iCollaboratory on or after June 1. 

This project is funded by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation.

Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students can measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. This project meets standards for Math, Science, Reading and Geography. Students receive buttons for each activity.

The second project officially begins June 1. If you start early your students will learn lots more. The dates you need to remember are June 1, and June 19, 20, 21, and 22. All angle measurements are due by June 23. Raw measurements should be taken on June 19, 20, 21 or 22. If those days are cloudy or your students are on vacation, please use Activity 7a or 7b to collect the correct measurements and post them early. 

  1. How Big is Earth is for classroom students ages 10-15 years.
  2. The project is based in the iCollaboratory (a Moodle and Google Apps for Education private domain)
  3. The project is found at http://new.icollaboratory.net/course/view.php?id=101
  4. All participants need a username and password to log in.
  5. If you are a teacher and need  an iCollaboratory user name, click Create Account adjacent to the Login link.
  6. To create accounts for your students send a list of student names, usernames and passwords to icollaboratory@gmail.com.

For more information, please contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Thank you,
Bonnie Thurber and the iCollaboratory Team

International Poetry Month begins April 1 for Students ages 5-17.

posted Mar 17, 2015, 5:49 PM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Mar 18, 2015, 7:29 AM ]

Whether it be a sonnet or a cinquain, we encourage students to share their literary work and discuss it with one another. Students use this project to develop their poetry knowledge and writing skills by sharing and discussing poems they have written, narrated and/or illustrated (optional) in an online Poetry Month community.


Activity 1: Participants Take a Poetry Survey April 1-7
Activity 2: Participants Select a Poem Type April 1-14
Activity 3: Participants Create a Google Webpage and Write a Poem April 7-21
Activity 4: Participants Share & Comment April 21-30
Activity 5: Participants Take the Final Survey and write a shared Reflective Summary

When students complete the five activities they receive an iCollaboratory Web Badge and a certificate of completion.

For registration and more information contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Moon Over Us: Moon Faces begins April 1, 2015 for Students ages 10-15 years

posted Mar 17, 2015, 5:46 PM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Mar 18, 2015, 7:30 AM ]

Moon Over Us: Moon Faces - April - May

In the project, student astronomers around the world exchange results and analyze the differences of images of the moon and discuss this information by commenting on each other’s webpages.

In addition, students will research and share stories and legends about the Moon. The result is an intercultural exchange of explanations about the differences and similarities of each country from the sky, the data gathering technology, and cultural traditions.
After completing the project, including a final survey and sharing reflections about their learning, students receive an iCollaboratory Web Badge and a certificate.

For registration and more information contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Eratosthenes Project, How Big is Earth Starts on Feb. 15, 2015

posted Feb 10, 2015, 7:09 AM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Feb 11, 2015, 8:25 AM ]


Hello Friends and Colleagues, 

Please register, review and begin the "How Big is Earth" project in the iCollaboratory on or after Feb. 15. 

This project is funded by International Astronomical Union (IAU) Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation.

Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students can measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. This project meets standards for Math, Science, Reading and Geography. Students receive buttons for each activity.

The project officially begins March 1. If you start early your students will learn lots more. The dates you need to remember are Feb. 15, March 1, and March 20, 21, and 22. All angle measurements are due by March 23. Raw measurements should be taken on March 20, 21 or 22. If those days are cloudy or your students are on vacation, please use Activity 7a or 7b to collect the correct measurements and post them early. 

• How Big is Earth is for classroom students ages 10-15 years.
• The project is based in the iCollaboratory (a Moodle and Google Apps for Education private domain)
• All participants need a username and password to log in.
• If you are a teacher and need  an iCollaboratory user name, please click create account on the login page.
• To create accounts for your students please view http://www.icollaboratory.org/create-accounts

For more information, please contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Thank you,
Bonnie Thurber and the iCollaboratory Team


iCollaboratory at NICE MiniCon 2015

posted Jan 26, 2015, 4:13 PM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Jan 31, 2015, 3:12 PM ]

Cartoon image of Eratosthnenes

Hello friends and colleagues,

Please join is at the NICE MiniCon on Satruday, Jan. 29, 2015. We are approaching 300 registrations and we expect a large influx both this week and on the day of. The official Twitter hashtag is #niceminicon, and we are running a top10 tweets promo this week. All of the the MiniCon details can be found  website, www.niceminicon.org. 

Please join Linda Smentek and Bonnie Thurber to learn more and participate in Google Classroom iCollaboratory Astronomy Projects including the brand new How Big is Earth project that has middle school teachers participating in February.  Students from classrooms and after-school computer clubs will begin the end of February through March second.


 iCollaboratory Astronomy projects include:
  • Moon Over Us
  • Moon Over Us: Phases and Faces
  • Moon Over Us:  Monthly Cycle and Influences on People
  • Sun Over Us: Solar Eclipse


How Big is Earth?

posted Jan 13, 2015, 3:46 PM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Jan 13, 2015, 3:58 PM ]

Alexandra Egypt tower
The iCollaboratory team is pleased to announce that Bonnie Thurber, as project leader, has been awarded funding support for "How Big is Earth" from IAU-OAD under Task Force 2: Children and Schools.

The project runs February-July 2015 with students participating in March and  again in June (Southern Hemisphere and Summer School). 

Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students can measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. (See Carl Sagan's depiction of this process at (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8cbIWMv0rI.)

YouTube Video


Students will be able to do science the same way Eratosthenes did in the iCollaboratory activities. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on a simplified version of the teacher's guide developed by that project. The difference between that activity and How Big Is Earth? is the online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory where teachers and students can collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. We will also maintain and share an ongoing database of student measurements. We will collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online. Students in each school will collaborate with students around the world; during the first year, schools in six countries will participate. We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.

If you are interested in having your middle school students participate, please contact icollaboratory@gmail.com

Thank you,

Bonnie Thurber and iCollaboratory Team

Scariest Stories & Fall Poetry 2014, Oct. 1-Nov. 8

posted Sep 26, 2014, 1:05 PM by Bonnie Thurber

Whether it be a scary story or a fall poem, we encourage students to share their literary work and discuss it with one another. Students can use this project to develop their writing skills by sharing and discussing their narrated and/or illustrated (optional) writing in our online community. 

The Scariest Stories project activities described below are designed to take about one hour a week in a school computer lab or on set of classroom computers. Teachers should plan to spend an hour a week in addition to the computer time. Students who get involved spend more time writing, sharing and discussing their stories. 

Activity 1: October 1-7: The Scariest Survey  
Students take an online Survey to learn about the other students who are participating, what they like to do on Halloween and what they are most scared of.

Activity 2; October 8-14: The Scariest Map
After registering for the Project, students, as a class, select one link representing their collective ideas about a scary story, Halloween tradition, or local legend from their hometown or region for students in other regions to view. Teachers submit the selected link to the Scariest Stories and Fall Poetry Map.  Note: Please email your Scariest Site with the street address and web address, city, state and ZIP to icollaboratory@gmail.com.

Activity 3: October 15-21: Write and Share Your Scariest Stories 
Students use their iCollaboratory Sites classroom account to write and share a scary story. The story may include text, illustrations and audio narration/sound effects (optional) or a very short video (optional). The stories can be written in any native language. 

Activity 4: October 22-31: Review and Discuss Stories
 Students review the stories others have written and discuss them online by contributing comments at the end of each story. The comments can be written in any native language. Please also translate them into English. 

Activity 5: November 1-7: Take the Scariest Stories and Fall Poetry Reflective Survey 

If you are interested in having your K-8 class participate in this project, please email iCollaboratory@gmail.com with your name and the number of students you would like to participate.

Thank you,
Bonnie Thurber and the iCollaboratory Team

Moon Over Us: Faces and Phases (Sept.-Oct.)

posted Sep 19, 2014, 11:12 AM by Bonnie Thurber   [ updated Sep 19, 2014, 11:12 AM ]

Distance between moon and earth, photographer unknown
In "Moon Over Us: Faces and Phases" project, students become cultural astronomers. They take a survey about the moon; draw images or take digital pictures of the moon once a week from September 21 to October 21 to get the full cycle; research and compare each others images of the moon; create webpages that include poetry, history, beliefs,stories, and research. Students use dialogue,comments, and discussion to share their valuable insights. The project ends with a final survey and sharing reflections. Students receive iCollaboratory/Kidlink Web Badges and a certificate for completing the project.

Please join us with your students by sending an email to icollaboratory@gmail.com letting us know how many students you have. Also attach a five column spread sheet with each student listed by  username, password, firstname, lastname, and school name.

We look forward to seeing you in this project.
Thank you,  Bonnie Thurber and the iCollaboratory Team.

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